Apparently starch can be resistant. And not in the awful I-will-cause-constipation way, in a way that is said to be beneficial. Keep in mind before you read further, food is a combination of cells and structures formed to give us what we call food.

 

What is resistant starch?

a Starch that is resistant to being digested, so it passes through the small intestine still intact. Technically based on this it could be a type of fibre, making sure you feel fuller for longer.

 

What exactly makes it resistant? 

There is a few factors that can come into play here. Firstly there is physical barrier formed around the cells of the said resistant starches that by pass the digestive enzymes around it; these would be bread, seeds and pulses. Secondly, the actual structure of the food can protect it from digestion, like potatoes.

Resistance is also caused by retrogradation. a Big word that describes the realigning of starch particles back into its position. Retrogradation happens when a cooked starch (i.e potatoes) is cooled down. Chemically modifying starch also makes starch resistant which can happen during certain parts of its process,  but in my personal opinion, I will try to not go the chemically modified way.

 

What does it mean for your health?

Some of the noted benefits of eating resistant starches is

  1. The glycemic response after a meal is good – meaning your sugar levels won’t spike too high after eating.
  2. It is said to counter the effects of red meat.
  3. Helps control good appetite and your shot term food intake by stimulating gut hormones and increasing satiety.
  4. It promotes the growth and stimulation of good bacteria in the gut, promoting good gut health.

 

a Few known resistant starches include potatoes, bananas (unripe), grains, pulses (beans, peas, chickpeas), oats.

 

Only (not even major) concern for me is why it has to be called resistant starch? Poor food group is already getting a bad reputation and being left our of everything. Apart from the name, I am definitely adding more of these to my diet.